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Tuesday - February 25, 2014

From: Smithville, TX
Region: Southwest
Topic: Planting, Seeds and Seeding, Soils, Grasses or Grass-like
Title: Native grass mix for Bastrop County, TX
Answered by: Barbara Medford


I plan to put in a small lawn on a tract of land near Rosanky, TX in Bastrop County. There are scattered oaks but the yard space will be mostly open. Soil is basically sandy. Is there a good native grass/mix for this location?


Frankly, there is only one NATIVE grass seed mix for Central Texas, and that is Habiturf, developed by the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center. Please read this previous Mr. Smarty Plants answer on growing in sandy soil. Then, please read this previous answer which we just published about 10 minutes ago. This answer has links to a recent Central Texas Gardener radio television program with an interview with one of the developers of Habiturf, Mark Simmons, as well as to our own website on how to prepare your soils and plant this grass.

Unfortunately, most of the grasses used in the United States are not only non-native, but some are invasive, and almost all of them use much too much water for drought-stricken Central Texas. That is why Habiturf is being developed and promoted by the Wildflower Center.


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