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Q. Who is Mr. Smarty Plants?

A: There are those who suspect Wildflower Center volunteers are the culpable and capable culprits. Yet, others think staff members play some, albeit small, role. You can torture us with your plant questions, but we will never reveal the Green Guru's secret identity.

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Ask Mr. Smarty Plants is a free service provided by the staff and volunteers at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

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Please forgive us, but Mr. Smarty Plants has been overwhelmed by a flood of mail and must take a break for awhile to catch up. We hope to be accepting new questions again soon. Thank you!

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Tuesday - February 25, 2014

From: Utopia, TX
Region: Southwest
Topic: Planting, Soils, Grasses or Grass-like
Title: Source for information on Habiturf from Utopia, TX
Answered by: Barbara Medford

QUESTION:

During a recent Central Texas Gardener TV show, someone from the Center mentioned that your Habiturf was going to be available as sod from someone in the San Antonio area this spring. Is that true and if so, who can I contact for more information?

ANSWER:

For others who maybe missed this Central Texas Gardener broadcast, here is a link to it. On that broadcast, Mark Simmons mentioned turf being developed by DK Seeds. The  company is Douglas King Seeds - that is a link to their website. Since you are in Uvalde County, virtually next door to Bexar County, where Douglas King  Seeds is located, it should be relatively easy for you to get what you need.

For others who want to know more about this mix of native grasses:

From a previous Mr. Smarty Plants answer:

"Since Habiturf was developed right here at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center (home of Mr. Smarty Plants) we certainly recommend Habiturf, and have extensive material on it to answer your questions. Please follow this link: Habiturf The Ecological Lawn and any other links in that answer. Be sure and pay attention to the information on preparing the site for your Habiturf, as that will involve removing unwanted plants and improving the soil quality. We hope you will be very happy with this water-conserving grass."

 

 

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