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Saturday - November 30, 2013

From: California, MD
Region: Mid-Atlantic
Topic: Soils
Title: Care of Dionaea muscipula (Venus flytrap)
Answered by: Nan Hampton


Does the venus flytrap grow better in nitrogen rich soil or in nitrogen poor soil with a diet of insects? Thank you so much for your time!


According to the instructions for growing Dionaea muscipula (Venus flytrap) from the International Carnivorous Plant Society, it tolerates almost any soil but grows best in pure sphagnum peat moss or a 1:1 sphagnum:sand mix.  Sphagnum peat moss contains 0.5 to 2.5% nitrogen but doesn't readily release it.  You can read about the nitrogen content (and more information) of peatmoss in Growing Media & Soil Amendment (A Horticultural Curriculum) from the Peat Moss Association.  So, I would say that it will do just fine in nitrogen poor soil.

However, more to the point, I think you should carefully read and follow the instructions in the Growing Dionea muscipula article from the International Carnivorous Plant Society as well as their Check List for Growing Dionea muscipula.  They have very clearly-written instructions for growing and feeding the Venus fly trap.  They are the experts for carnivorous plants!  Indeed, I wish that I had read these instructions some 10 years ago when I received a Venus fly trap as a gift.  It lasted about 3 weeks in my care before it gave up the ghost.

Best of luck with your Venus fly trap!


From the Image Gallery

Venus flytrap
Dionaea muscipula

Venus flytrap
Dionaea muscipula

Venus flytrap
Dionaea muscipula

Venus flytrap
Dionaea muscipula

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