Explore Plants

Share

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants

Ask Mr. Smarty Plants is a free service provided by the staff and volunteers at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

Search Smarty Plants
    
 

Can't find the answer in our existing FAQs, submit a question to Mr. Smarty Plants.
Need help with plant identification, visit the plant identification page.

rate this answer
Not Yet Rated

Saturday - November 30, 2013

From: Austin, TX
Region: Southwest
Topic: General Botany
Title: Do bees visit cedar trees and other conifers for pollen?
Answered by: Nan Hampton

QUESTION:

I was wondering if honey bees or native bees visit cedar trees for pollen? and what about other conifers?

ANSWER:

According to this Encyclopedia Britannica article, in the gymnosperms (conifers, ginkgos, cycads and gnetophytes) only the conifers and ginkgos are exclusively wind-pollinated; whereas, the cycads and gnetophytes, as well as being wind-pollinated, have some species that are insect pollinated.  Some cycads are pollinated by beetles and may have a symbiotic relationship with them.  Some of the gnetophytes (Ephedra, Gnedum and Welwitschia) produce a nectar that attracts insects and are pollinated by insects.  Other gnetophytes are pollinated by the wind.  You can read an article about the gymnosperms from Tulane University and from the University of Wisconsin.

So, the answer to your question is that, as far as we know, bees (native or otherwise) do not make use of the pollen of cedar trees or any other conifer.

 

More General Botany Questions

Is there a flower that blooms only once in seven years?
December 17, 2008 - Just wanted to know if there exists a flower that blooms only once in seven years? Thank you!
view the full question and answer

How does Styrax youngiae differ from other Texas Styrax species?
August 18, 2013 - How does the Styrax youngae differ from other Texas styrax? Where can I find a description of all the Texas styrax trees?
view the full question and answer

Trillium phototropism
May 16, 2010 - I'm SURE you haven't had this question before. I live in northern Michigan in a wooded subdivision where we have clouds of wild grandiflorum trilliums growing in the woods on either side of the roa...
view the full question and answer

Comments on white-flowered Mountain Laurel from Austin
December 23, 2012 - Following up on the August 23, 2012, question from Driftwood about the white-flowering mountain laurel, I have found a few more leads to explore. First, there are four more images of white-flowering m...
view the full question and answer

Copper beech
May 12, 2005 - Hi, I work for a youth camp in southeastern Pennsylvania. The property for the camp was purchased from a farmer in 1958. The farmer was a collecter of unusual trees and one of the trees on our prop...
view the full question and answer

Smarty Plants's Facebook profile Support the Wildflower Center by Donating Online or Becoming a Member today.

Mr. Smarty Plants wants you to be his Facebook friend. Click the Facebook icon to add yourself to Mr. Smarty Plants list of friends.